Solano Magazine
Folded in 2008


 

Since 2003 until it closed down, Solano Magazine celebrated the region's lifestyles with an intelligent mix of features, columns, must-have guides and resources.
Content is from the site's 2008 archived pages, giving a quick taste of what this magazine offered its readership..

Solano Magazine
711 Madison St, Fairfield, CA 94533
Phone: 707.428.4440
Fax: 707.428.4441

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Solano Magazine folds after five years

By Ben Antonius / McNaughton Newspapers

FAIRFIELD- After five boom-and-bust years, Solano Magazine shut down last month.

The publication launched with a bang in 2003, with publishers boasting of raking in nearly $1 million in revenue in their first full year. But the magazine apparently suffered along with the rest of the local and national economy.

As the finishing touches were being put on the October issue, staff members said owner and publisher Michelle Branton broke the news that she had filed for bankruptcy. Branton didn't return calls seeking comment.

We knew things weren't going well, said Julia Smith, who had been the sales director.

About 30 issues of the glossy, full-color publication were produced during its run, many of which are still available online at http://www.solanomag.com.

Solano was one of the area's two community-oriented magazines, the other is Vacaville Magazine, which is still operating.

The company also was active in the community, including organizing an annual golf tournament to raise money for children's health insurance premiums. This year's event took place in late September.

However, staff members said there were signs of trouble, including the fact that the August-September issue was produced but never actually printed.

On Oct. 8, associate editor Ana Cotham sent out a farewell e-mail.

We wish you and yours the very best and thank you for your support over the past five years, she said.

 

About Solano Magazine

 Solano Magazine celebrates the region's lifestyles with an intelligent mix of features, columns, must-have guides and resources. With a sophisticated editorial voice, Solano Magazine reflects the dynamics of Solano, Napa, Yolo and surrounding regions by turning the spotlight on the people, places and things that appeal to its affluent residents.

Linking the metropolitan areas of Central Northern California between San Francisco, Sacramento, Napa and Walnut Creek, the Solano region is vibrant with recreation, wineries, culture, major attractions, shopping, dining, and so much more. Its residents are affluent and influential consumers that bring over $60 million in annual sales to the region. Solano Magazine provides the only lifestyle resource for area residents, making that reason enough to advertise in every issue!

Established in 2003, Solano Magazine has seen tremendous growth and success within a relatively short period of time. This is due in part to the contemporary look and editorial voice of the publication that comprehensively represents the region. Solano Magazine has also gained popularity and recognition because it answers a strong demand from area residents as the guide to good life in Central Northern California.

Food & Spirits

Solano Magazine / February-March 2008 / Chocolate love

Chocolate love

A bittersweet romance

Shelly G. Keller
Our collective appetite for gourmet chocolate has grown from a Valentine’s Day splurge to an everyday treat. Here’s a look at the allure of artisan chocolate made with love by a premier chocolatier and the latest on dark chocolate’s many benefits—giving us all the more reason to celebrate.

When co-founders John Scharffenberger and Robert Steinberg launched Scharffen Berger Chocolate Maker in 1996, they drew heavily upon Scharffenberger’s refined palate and love of dark chocolate, as well as his experience as a maker of sparkling wines. “I’d already worked on a complicated production process when I was making sparkling wine. Winemaking production rules are so stringent; it’s a very ‘take-no-prisoners’ process. Winemaking is also very competitive––how many other consumer products have 4,000 brands in the competition like wine has?”

Scharffenberger and Steinberg had known each other since the early 1980s. After Scharffenberger sold his interest in Scharffenberger Cellars, Steinberg approached him about making artisan chocolate. “I thought, ‘Wow! What a great idea!’ We set out to make the richest, most flavorful chocolate by using artisan methods and sourcing the best cacao beans in the world.”

Scharffen Berger chocolate is masterfully crafted in small batches of just 300 pounds using old-world chocolate-making methods and restored vintage European machinery. As with wine and coffee, the origin of premium chocolate has become a selling point. Scharffen Berger chocolate, made from proprietary cacao bean blends from nine different cacao-growing regions throughout the world, showcases the intense and complex flavors present in cacao. In addition to cacao beans, which are considered a fruit, Scharffen Berger chocolate also contains sugar, cocoa butter and very small amounts of lecithin and vanilla from whole vanilla beans imported from Madagascar and Tahiti, a rare practice in chocolate manufacturing. The resulting fruity, winy, complex dark chocolate is consistently good for eating as well as baking.

Scharffen Berger’s chocolate bar collection comes in a variety of cacao percentages, including 41 percent cacao milk chocolate, 62 percent cacao semisweet chocolate, 70 percent cacao bittersweet chocolate, 82 percent cacao extra dark chocolate and 99 percent cacao unsweetened chocolate, which contains no sugar at all. The percentages indicate by weight the amount of cacao in the chocolate. Scharffen Berger also sells Natural Cocoa Powder and Cacao Nibs, little pieces of roasted cacao beans with fruity, earthy flavors that can add a nutty crunch to desserts and salads. Scharffenberger says if he could only have one kind of chocolate, he’d choose his personal favorite: the Scharffen Berger 82 percent.
   

Before Scharffenberger and Steinberg started making chocolate, California was already home to a number of noted chocolate makers: Ghirardelli in San Francisco, Nestlé USA in Glendale, Guittard Chocolate Company in Burlingame and See’s Candies in South San Francisco. In 2000, California edged out Pennsylvania, home of Hershey’s, to become the country’s chocolate capital. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, by 2004 California had 136 companies producing chocolate and cocoa products compared to Pennsylvania’s 122.

Just like a winery, Scharffen Berger offers tours of its Berkeley factory where 40,000 visitors a year learn about chocolate making and munch on samples. Scharffenberger, who used to lead the tours when the company first started, says his favorite part is still the tasting. “That’s really what it comes down to—teaching people how to really taste chocolate and understand the different flavors.” The flavor sequence occurs in about 10 seconds, he says. “First, take a little bite, chew a little and then swallow. You need to get your palate tuned into chocolate’s flavors. Assess how it snaps and cracks and how a little smell comes through. Even more smell comes through when it sits on your tongue because you smell it internally.”

Scharffenberger then explains how the flavors are further detected as the chocolate melts. “You taste the fruit acids and they taste sour. Then you taste the fruit and it becomes more identifiable—sometimes cherry, sometimes pruney. Your mouth starts to dry out and the soft tannins in the chocolate trick your brain into asking, ‘What’s down there on my tongue?’” He says if the chocolate is good and the tannins are right, the flavor will linger for a few minutes. “You don’t have to eat a lot of chocolate to get a lot of satisfaction.”

As for the growing body of evidence about the health benefits of dark chocolate, Scharffenberger responds, “We like to say that it has nutritional value so its reputation for sinfulness and decadence becomes less important.”<

University of California, Davis researchers, however, are more specific. While they’re still figuring out exactly how the nutrients in chocolate offer such wide-reaching health benefits, evidence is mounting that they do. Carl Keen, professor of nutrition and internal medicine, has been looking at the compounds in cocoa and chocolate, especially the flavonoids and its subgroup, flavonols. “What intrigues me is the hypothesis that diets rich in plant foods reduce the risk for some diseases, including cardiovascular disease. We’ve had one surprise after another researching these compounds.

“There is increasing evidence that consuming flavonoid-rich cocoas and chocolate can be associated with a number of positive effects with respect to vascular health. For example, when you eat flavonol-rich chocolate, a high proportion of the flavonols are rapidly absorbed, with high concentrations occurring in the blood in about 45 minutes to an hour. As a result, there is an increased production of nitric oxide, an important gas in the body that can help blood vessels to relax, thus improving blood flow. There are some reports that over time this can result in reductions in blood pressure. What we’re learning opens the door to a ‘let food be thy medicine’ philosophy. We really can get some strong health effects from certain foods.”

Ounce for ounce, dark chocolate typically contains more flavonols than any fruit or vegetable out there; thus, there is the perception that the darker the chocolate, the greater the boost to your health. However, it is important to note that the flavonoid content of chocolate can be markedly influenced by food processing techniques. Some sources suggest that a daily ounce of chocolate containing at least 60 percent cacao provides all the flavonols you need to reap health benefits.

Flavonols have been shown to improve the ability of blood vessels to expand and contract, providing for better blood flow in your brain, hands and legs. They help the body use nitric oxide, which regulates blood pressure, thereby lowering it. They increase HDL (good) cholesterol, lowering the risk of heart attack. And like aspirin, flavonols decrease the stickiness of blood platelets, reducing the risk of blood clots and stroke. Dark chocolate’s benefits don’t stop at the heart. Some researchers suggest that flavonols may also help fight inflammation, prevent prostate disease and even boost your mood.

As for chocolate’s mood-altering qualities, what about its reputation as an aphrodisiac? Scharffenberger confides, “I think it’s a sex substitute, not an aphrodisiac. Chocolate affects your pleasure center in a minor way. If you can’t have sex, have chocolate.”

 



Grub Lounge

March 13, 2008

Ernesto's Mexican Food, Sacramento

When I first moved to midtown Sacramento, there was one restaurant down the street from me that always seemed to be overflowing with people, day or night, any season: Ernesto's Mexican Food. I was told the food was good, but despaired of ever knowing for myself since, as I said, it always seemed to be overflowing with people. Clearly I'd have had to put my name down last week for a table next month. (OK, so, maybe the patio was vacant when it was raining. My point still stands.)

Well, one day, my brother and I decided to brave the crowds for lunch. It was easier to get a table than I thought it would be—we even got to sit outside! Since that first bite of their grilled chicken, marinated and seasoned with spices like Heavenly, Tasteriffic and Muy Sabroso, I’ve been back several times.

Here’s where my review falls apart. I wish I could recommend more than either their grilled chicken Caesar salad or the chicken avocado salad. But I can’t, because those are the only two things I order when I go. I cannot resist them and make myself try something new. I know their tortilla chips are always fresh and hot, served with a chunky salsa and a bean and cheese dip (in separate bowls; it’s not a salsa-bean-cheese concoction). I know the nachos are good, because I’ve stolen some off my brother’s plate. Speaking of my brother, he swears by their fish tacos with its creamy chipotle sauce, not overly spicy but just spicy enough for his high tolerance. I know that the restaurant, which has been named Best Mexican Food by Sacramento Magazine, does not use lard, nor use any animal-based ingredients such as chicken stock in their vegetarian dishes. I am positive that many other dishes on the lunch and dinner menu, such as albondigas (Mexican meatball soup), shrimp ceviche or the fajitas, are delicious; I keep eyeing the strawberry margarita cheesecake on their dessert menu. They also serve up a weekend brunch menu that looks enticing.

But alas. As I was saying, if you wish to know about these other dishes, you’ll have to go there yourself. I don’t know about anything but the two plates I keep ordering. All I can say is, as we move into the summer months, be prepared to fight more aggressively for those coveted outside tables—better yet, get there early. Like last week.—A.C.

Posted on Thursday, March 13, 2008 in Grub Lounge

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March 1, 2008

Alejandro's Taqueria, Fairfield

What’s a wet burrito? Mmmmm. It’s two bangs for the buck, that’s what it is! Wet burritos make my tummy oh so happylicious, and then I pass out in frugal gastronomic bliss.

A wet burrito is most commonly referred to as a burrito “mojado”, which means “dunked or drenched” in Spanish. It’s a burrito with—usually red—sauce poured all over the top of it, hence the nickname “wet”. (For those unfamiliar with burrito culture, they are typically served “dry” and wrapped in tin foil for easy I-don’t-need-no-stinking-utensils eating.)

At Alejandro’s Taqueria in downtown Fairfield, the mojado comes drenched in red sauce and oozy melted cheddar cheese. At first glance, the dish looks like your standard burrito with sauce all over it, which is not special. Generally speaking, Alejandro’s burritos are terrific any way you order it: dry or wet. But with the mojado you get two dishes in one, and what was once normal turns into spectacular. You see, Alejandro’s always give you a side order of tortilla chips and salsa to accompany your ginormous burrito. (Seriously, these burritos can feed a family of twelve.) Now, take a chip and scoop up some oozy cheese and sauce. Better yet, catch some burrito innards at the same time and all of a sudden you’ve got nachos on steroids—rice, beans, tomatoes, sour cream, guacamole, chicken or beef, and goopy cheesy red sauce all served up on an edible spoon called the tortilla chip. It’s heavenly, I tell ya. You get a burrito and nachos experience all in the same dish without being tethered to either. And it’s just $6.

For those of you thinking, “Um. Michelle? This isn’t a new concept, honey. Hel-lo! You’re just dipping a chip.” Oh, stop raining on my parade.

Besides, I know good food; Alejandro’s dishes the best mojados in town. And if you don’t believe me, then just ask all those people waiting in line to place their order. —M.B.

Posted on Saturday, March 1, 2008 in Grub Lounge

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February 28, 2008

Somerset Restaurant, Oakland

One of my mother’s and my favorite places to spend a girls’ day out is the College Avenue/Rockridge area of Oakland (just a mile or two down, College Avenue turns into Berkeley and leads directly to the campus). A couple Sundays ago, we met up at the Rockridge BART station, stashed our cars and began walking. Yeah, OK, the lot is supposed to be for BART patrons only—but it was virtually empty on a Sunday morning.

Our girls’ days are usually comprised of two goals: shopping for a particular item, and eating ... um, anything. The shopping goal for the day was to find myself a pair of black flats for me. It was a moral imperative, as I was currently flouting the UWL (Universal Womens Law) by not owning a single pair of black flats. (No, that doesn’t mean that I actually owned several pairs.) Anyway, in short order, I found these at Tootsie’s (5525 College Ave., (510) 595-7272).

When it came to lunch, though, we were at a standstill. It’s not as though there’s a lack of restaurants within the vicinity. Oliveto’s is always one of the better options, but I didn’t see much on the menu that appealed to me that particular day; and the other restaurants we passed (a bar and grill, Mexican, Chinese) seemed sort of pedestrian. We were in the Bay Area! Give me some good California cuisine. We kept walking, shopping and talking, and after about another hour, discovered and decided to try Somerset Restaurant, just a couple blocks from the Rockridge BART station.

The restaurant was small, on the dark-wood side, and bustling, with diners on the left 2/3 of the room, and a bar (with one of those old-fashioned Read Weight Free machines) on the right. Though the place was full, we were immediately seated. However, the table for two was squooshed up between a larger table and a short wall. Mom, looking a little claustrophobic, asked if there was anything else available. Within a few minutes, we had a larger table, more in the open and not hip-to-hip with another party.

The menu was chock-full of your standard California cuisine selections, many with a slight twist, and all of them sounding tasty. Some of the more intriguing lunch items included were an artichoke-black olive tart with spinach and feta cheese, broiled petrale sole with coconut-lemon rice, eggplant cutlet sandwich, and a roasted corn salad. (The dinner menu listed a carmelized Prosciutto and Black Mission fig dish with goat cheese, pistachios and port sauce, which made me wish we’d been there later.) Mom ordered the Cobb salad without the egg. Although I’m a sucker for salad, because she ordered one, I opted for the veggie pizza du jour. We also ordered a side of biscuits and iced tea.

Mom’s salad was huge and tasty, as most Cobb salads tend to be, with a very nice honey-mustard-Champagne dressing. Easily half of it was left by the time she was full. My pizza was delicious: the thin crust was crunchy, the veggies fresh and flavorful. Although I abhor raw onions of any sort, carmelized onions bring just the right touch of zing. And the fontina—well, it’s cheese. Is cheese ever wrong?

The Iced Tea Report: “It was a nice color, but a little on the weak side,” Mom reports. “There was enough flavor to pick up, though it wasn’t strong. It needed body. I wasn’t bowled over by it.”

Our server, incidentally, forgot our biscuits, but brought them right away when we mentioned we were still waiting for them. They were your standard buttermilk biscuits—freshly made, but nothing extraordinary.

One of the drawbacks of the restaurant is that the acoustics were terrible. It was crowded and so loud that Mom and I, even though we were seated off to the side, had to raise our voices to be heard. After lunch, we went to the antique store next door, and we could easily hear the diners through the wall.

Would we go there again? Yes, definitely. (However, Mom might bring her own tea next time.) —A.C.

Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 in Grub Lounge

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February 16, 2008

Bistro Jeanty, Yountville

For quite some time I have wanted to check out Bistro Jeanty in Yountville. Not because it received a Michelin star on the 2008 Michelin list, but because it’s a popular favorite amongst locals in the Napa Valley. You’ll hear about many who go at least once a week for lunch or dinner and just eat at the bar. Apparently, it’s a local hangout.

I arrived for lunch at 11:28 a.m. (we had a reservation for 11:30) on Valentine’s Day. The front door was locked and there was an expectant crowd gathered on the sidewalk eagerly peering inside. Hmm. Interesting. To our relief, at exactly 11:30 they unlocked the front door and let us in. Phew. Hungry mobs can be a tad dangerous.   

The atmosphere is cozy, casual and intimate just like a bistro should be. If you’re there with a date, ask for the table for two in front of the fireplace. It’s darling.

Deciding on lunch took forever. Everything on the menu was enticing: rabbit pâté with celery root apple salad, pike dumplings, pork belly with lentil balsamic and foie gras ragout, mussels steamed in red wine, cassoulet (baked beans with duck confit, sausage and apple smoked bacon), tournedos with black pepper crust. The list of yummies went on and on. Oh brother. I wanted one of everything.

(As a side note, I feel compelled to note that steak tartare was on the menu. This is the second or third time in as many weeks that I’ve noticed steak or “beef” tartare popping up on menus in both Northern and Southern California. Does this mean that it’s coming back in style? Or that I’ve been too busy to notice that it never went out of style?)

In the end, we decided to splurge knowing that we’d have to box up most as leftovers. This strategy was totally worth it! We started with croutons de foie blond (duck foie gras pâté with a port poached pear) and the sweetbreads and shiitake pie. Both were wonderful, but the pâté was particularly light and silky.

Next came the main courses. I had the coq au vin and my companion had the ham and leek quiche with a butter lettuce salad prepared the way I love to see it—gently washed whole leaves of butter lettuce topped with a simple vinaigrette, salt and pepper. That’s it. Nothing fancy, just fresh flavors. The entrées were simple, hearty and ridiculously delicious.

Although I was about to bust a gut, we had to order a dessert to share. And what else to order at a bistro but a crêpe—with powdered sugar, orange marmalade and a reduced orange brandy. Served flat, the crêpe was the size of a medium pizza.

After such an indulgent lunch, we clutched the prized to-go boxes to our chests and rolled ourselves in the direction of our automobiles, all the while discussing when we’d be back.

And despite the fact—or maybe because—it was Valentine’s Day, I have to admit that I fell a little bit (okay, a lot) in love with Bistro Jeanty. —M.B.

Posted on Saturday, February 16, 2008 in Grub Lounge

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February 6, 2008

Hush, Laguna Beach

On a recent trip to Los Angeles, I was fortunate to garner an invitation to meet for drinks at Hush in Laguna Beach. Located on the main drag in downtown Laguna Beach, Hush offers a contemporary, upscale experience whether you’re in the elegant blue neon accented bar or the quietly sophisticated dining room. It’s a nice contrast to the rest of Laguna’s beachy casual establishments. Having checked out the website prior to arrival, I was intrigued by their extensive wine list and the variety of imported proteins.

In L.A.’s Friday night traffic, it took me over three hours to get from Santa Monica to Laguna Beach. So of course I was late, starving and nervy from driving illegally in the carpool lane. (If not for the HOV lane, I shudder to think how long it would have taken me.) By the time I reached the restaurant, all I wanted was a magnum of wine, a straw and a dark corner.

Although I had anticipated enjoying only a cocktail and appetizer, I was delighted to sit down for a real dinner.

Still shaky from the drive and unable to focus my eyes to read the menu, I gave up and asked the waiter to recommend his favorites. Sea bass? Great. Bring me one of those and another magnum of pinot noir, please.

Luckily, my companion for dinner was a bit more quick-witted. He started us out with one of Hush’s signature appetizers: Maine lobster-crayfish macaroni and cheese. Yup. You got it. Comfort food with style. Grated black truffles and white truffle oil added a little earthiness to the seafood flavors of this dish. While delicious, it might have been a little too earthy for my tastes. Truffles are tricky. The flavor balance needs to be perfect.

Next came the sea bass. Pan-seared and accompanied by Brussels sprouts and barley risotto, the dish was solid. The brandy reduction was a beautiful accent to both the lightness of the fish and the bitterness of the Brussels sprouts.

Finally it was time to choose dessert. (When I order my entrée, I always inquire about the desserts. It gives me something to look forward to.) Our waiter had cooed over the banana strudel made with phyllo dough. Can you call it strudel if it’s made with phyllo? I dunno. I was skeptical. In the end, I was urged to face my fears and order the strudel. Holy crapola! Am I glad that I did! The first bite was ambrosia. Warm banana wrapped in dough softened by crème caramel. The potential disaster with the combination of banana and caramel is that it can easily become overpoweringly sweet. This was not at all the case. It was nice and subtle, soft in its flavors and textures. If you really want that extra punch of sweet to come forward, enjoy the strudel with the Inniskillin Ice Wine, the suggested pairing. For a lighter taste, a blanc de blanc sparkling might be nice. Or more to my own taste, a deeper zinfandel port, which might bring out some depth in the flavors. No matter the pairing, the dessert was a heavenly way to end the meal.

Would I go back? Absolutely! It’s the ideal restaurant to single-course dine because the selections within each course are varied enough to be interesting. Go for appetizers only or just dessert and pair your culinary delights with something off the more than extensive wine list. It’ll feel decadent any way you play it.

And if you’re stumped on what to get because the options look too good? Just ask your waiter for his favorites and you won’t go wrong. I know I didn’t.—M. Branton

Posted on Wednesday, February 6, 2008 in Grub Lounge |

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January 18, 2008

Rutherford Grill, Napa

Every couple of months, my mother and I like to meet up somewhere for lunch and a little shopping. It's often in the Napa Valley somewhere, since it's a sort of mid-point between my home (Sacramento) and hers (Danville). One question we always have is, Where to go for lunch? This time she decided she wanted to try Rutherford Grill. Mom, always knowing best, had the brilliant idea of getting there right as they opened for lunch. It was a Saturday, and we were seated right away, but the place filled up in no time at all.
Up came the menu. We try to eat healthfully, particularly if we have a day of shopping in.

Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 in Grub Lounge

 



Entertainment

Solano Calendar

Feb 27, 2008 to Feb 28, 2008 - “Flying animals and other attractions”

Marcia Cary is a former landscape designer and many of her paintings use shapes repeatedly seen in nature. Marcia acknowledges her connection with plants and their relationship...

Feb 27, 2008 to Mar 7, 2008 - Brian Copeland: Not a Genuine Black Man

"In 1972, the National Committee against Discrimination in Housing Called San Leandro, California 'a racist bastion of white supremacy.' It was named one of the most racist...

Feb 29, 2008 to Feb 29, 2008 - Audition: Ladies at the Alamo

The performance is presented by Horizon Arts Group. Written by Paul Zindel and directed by David Rodgers Jr.10 a.m.-1 p.m. March 1: by appointment only.Cast:  5 females...

Mar 10, 2008 to Mar 10, 2008 - Empty Bowls

Join the Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano to celebrate 10 years in its building with an “Empty Bowls” event presented by Tesoro Corporation. Guests are invited to a...

Feb 27, 2008 to Mar 8, 2008 - Solano College Theatre presents Intimate Apparel

Esther, the heroine of Lynn Nottage's award-winning play, is an African-American seamstress in New York City of 1905, a time of tumult and transition in America. Her creations...

Feb 27, 2008 to May 30, 2012 - Americana: 50 States, 50 Months, 50 Exhibitions

The long-term presentation consists of 50 displays, each approximately one month long, coorganized by WattisInstitute director Jens Hoffmann and CCA's Graduate Program in...

 



Food & Spirits


Solano Magazine / February-March 2008 / Hawaii

Hawaii

A whole new world is just an afternoon away

Ana Cotham
Hawaiian Bath and Body

Hawaii is the perfect getaway for people in our region. It’s relatively close, at best a four-and-a-half hour flight, and good deals can be had for $300 or less if you stay alert and are willing to be flexible with times and layovers. However, the best flight direct to Honolulu from San Francisco, Oakland or Sacramento airports leaves between 8:30 and 9 a.m., putting you in Honolulu, the state capital on the island of O`ahu, just in time for lunch— a perfect way to kick off the first day of your vacation.    

When my mother and I fly to Hawaii to visit my grandparents, our usual routine after lunch is to go to our favorite sites and do some shopping. But on our last trip, I decided to start with something a little different: a Deluxe Thalasso Therapy with Color and Essential Oils, and a Coconut and Lime Body Scrub—a sensible decision since airplane rides are hard on the body.

The treatments are on the menu at the J.W. Marriott Ihilani Resort & Spa, which is part of the Ko Olina Resort and Marina (about 20 minutes east of Honolulu), along with the Ko Olina Golf Club, Marriott’s Ko Olina Beach Club and the soon-to-be Disney Resort. It has a few brand-new buildings and lots of construction in a pretty and still relatively vacant expanse of shoreline. It also includes four man-made pristine lagoons, perfect for beach-lounging or lazy swimming.

We got there in time for lunch first, at Naupaka Terrace, the hotel’s outdoor bistro, which has a lovely, relaxed ambiance and prides itself on using local and healthful foods. I sampled the farmers market salad with fresh greens and a shiitake tomato vinaigrette, deliciously crunchy spring rolls and the coconut shrimp, which comes with an apricot dipping sauce charmingly served in a small, halved coconut shell. After lunch I checked into the spa.

The Ihilani Spa is an intimate space with a Roman bath, steam room, sauna and treatment rooms. It is one of two spas in the U.S. (New Jersey is the other) that offers the Thalasso treatment: a European-style underwater massage, with warm seawater pumped straight in from the ocean. Between the four treatment options—relaxation, circulation, toning and energizing—I opted for circulation, an unusual choice for my relaxing tendencies. Once in the huge, deep tub, the attendant massaged my feet, put an aromatherapy compress on my forehead, and turned on the jets with some soothing blue tub lights. It was like a high-tech Jacuzzi, with hard spray rolling up and down both sides of my body. The water was warm and clear; the lights and the essential oils were peaceful. After about ten minutes, the attendant returned to change the compress, adjusted the tub lights to a rotation of vibrant reds, greens and golds, and cooled the water temperature. I then knew why it was called circulation—it lowered my body temperature so much that I was shivering uncontrollably by the end of the treatment. My circulation was definitely invigorated.

I was then led to the body scrub treatment room. The scrub room attendant showed me the tray of ingredients: Hawaiian sea salt, tiny shreds of fresh coconut, and fresh lemon zest (they’d run out of lime that day). Afterward, I was led to the needle shower, a round shower stall with 16 jets to get you at all angles. Then, I went to look at my skin in the dressing room. The exfoliation left it bright red but exceptionally smooth; the redness faded immediately, but my skin remained smooth for several days.

After that, it was time to head back to Honolulu to resume our typical first-day activities. But while we have our own traditions, people on a new vacation in a new place will invariably create their own traditions, their own stories. Honolulu is unparalleled when it comes to catering to a cross-section of personal interests.
Usually, we have lunch at Gordon Biersch Brewery in Aloha Tower, an airy outdoor mall near Honolulu’s downtown financial district. Aloha Tower has plenty of tourist-friendly shops to browse, and the brewery’s patio, right on Honolulu Harbor where the cruise ships come in, is very relaxing. If you feel the need to walk off calamari and beer afterward, a stroll along the harbor takes you past fish food stands, where you can buy a handful of food to sprinkle into the water for the countless fish that bob up for a treat. (Traffic is notoriously bad, so it’s preferable to be mobile by foot whenever you can, but keep comfortable by wearing proper walking shoes instead of the sandals or flip-flops you might want to put on.)

About two miles east of Aloha Tower, at Ala Moana Boulevard and Ward Avenue, is where the shopping really starts. Ward Centers—comprised of Ward Centre, Ward Warehouse and a few other Ward entities—has a number of island apparel and gift shops as well as art galleries to check out. Just a few blocks farther down Ala Moana Boulevard is the aptly named Ala Moana Center. The large mall’s stores range from Hilo Hattie’s to Gucci, and a variety of other stores for both residents and tourists. There’s Lupicia for tea lovers, the Cookie Corner for cookie lovers, and the Slipper House for when you want to get started on your flip-flop or “slippah” collection.

Farther eastward is Waikiki, a true shopper’s paradise. Stores from Prada, Hermes and Tiffany & Co. to simple beachwear and surf shops, and the infamous ABC stores, line the streets. There are also a number of more concentrated shopping areas: The relatively new showcase Waikiki Beach Walk starts on Lewers Street between Kalia Road and Kalakaua Avenue; the International Marketplace is an open-air market of shops and artisan stands; and the Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center has more than 100 shops and restaurants to explore.

Some people might be more interested in Hawaii’s history and culture than its merchandise, and there is no shortage of places that will fulfill that desire. If there is any single must-see on O`ahu, it’s the USS Arizona National Memorial at Pearl Harbor, simply for the fact that it’s such an integral, emotional and living part of U.S. history. Guests can begin by exploring the exhibits at the Visitor’s Center. The tour itself begins with a short film about the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, followed by a boat trip to the memorial itself. The memorial sits atop the USS Arizona, which can still be seen underwater.

Museum buffs should take the time to visit the Bishop Museum. Founded in the late 1880s, the museum is renowned worldwide for its research projects, educational programs, and collection of artifacts, documents and photographs about Hawaii and other Pacific island cultures. On the local art side, Honolulu has numerous art galleries, from the esteemed Honolulu Academy of Art (honoluluacademy.org) to smaller spaces in and around Honolulu’s downtown (aka Chinatown) district that have regular hours and participate in a lively First Friday Hawaii, a monthly open-late event featuring free entertainment and special activities (firstfridayhawaii.com).

The beauty of Honolulu, though, is that if shopping or museums aren’t your forte, stretching your legs and soaking up some sunshine, or simply wandering around—strolling down Waikiki beach, or walking down Kalakaua Avenue toward the Honolulu Zoo and the Waikiki Aquarium—is enough to fill an afternoon and more. And when it’s time to put up your feet, the Halekulani’s famous House Without a Key restaurant will welcome you for sunset cocktails with live Hawaiian music and hula dancing. With the legendary Diamond Head as your backdrop, what better way to welcome the sunset on your first day?

 

For more information, visit Hawaii Visitors and Convention Bureau

 



HEALTH

Bridging the gap

California programs fill growing need for physician assistants and nursing professionals.

By Miriam Raftery
California will face a shortage of 5,000 to 17,000 doctors over the next decade. Increasingly, patient needs are being filled by physician assistants and nursing professionals.

Job opportunities
“There is definitely a demand for both physician assistants (PAs) and family nurse practitioners (FNPs),” says Michael Denis, a student enrolled in a PA program at the University of California, Davis. “With the current nationwide situation with health care, there’s a huge need to fill the gap with these mid-level providers.”
    Both PAs and FNPs practice under supervision of a physician. The first PA program was founded at Duke University to create civilian jobs for military corpsmen and medics returning from Vietnam. In 2007, 245 million patient visits were made to PAs, according to the American Association of Physician Assistants (AAPA). The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has ranked physician assistant as the fourth fastest growing profession nationally.
    “PAs come from traditional or nontraditional medical backgrounds,” Denis notes. “Often they are paramedics, military or foreign medical graduates, whereas the nurse practitioners are the four-year, Bachelor of Science degree nurses who come from a nursing background. However, a lot of the protocols we are allowed to practice under are very similar.” Average salaries nationally are around $75,000 a year for PAs and around $77,000 for nurse practitioners, though certain specialties and locations command higher wages, he adds.
    California also faces a shortage of nurses—a gap new training programs seek to fill. According to a May 2007 report from the California Legislative Analyst’s Office, the state is short 4,696 registered nurses (RNs)—a shortage that is expected to double by 2014. The gap is caused by population growth, an increasing number of older Californians, and nurses nearing retirement age.
    According to the University of California, San Francisco’s Center for California Health Workforce Studies, the number of nursing school graduates in California has fortunately increased nearly 70 percent over the last five years, reaching a projected number of over 10,000 new RN graduates per year; new programs have also emerged to further ease the nursing shortage. The ratio of RNs per general population in California is much smaller versus the national ratio (about 650 full-time RNs per population of 100,000, versus 825) but as of 2006 California RNs typically earned a higher hourly wage ($36.12) than the national average ($28.71).

Education Opportunities

A $4.2 million grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, in support of its Betty Irene Moore Nursing initiative, has helped fund a partnership among City College of San Francisco, California Pacific Medical Center and St. Luke’s Hospital to launch an Associate Degree Nursing Education program. Classes began in fall 2005, with the program projected to graduate more than 80 nurses over a four-year period. The foundation has also awarded funds to establish the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis.

“We anticipate starting enrollment in about 2009,” says Ann Bonham, executive associate dean. “The focus initially will be on master’s and Ph.D.s. Then we will roll out a bachelor’s in nursing program approximately two years following that.”

The program aims to educate nursing students to practice in an increasingly complex health care system including not only hospital settings, but also community clinics, public health service, government agencies and other emerging health care environments.

“The Institute of Medicine came out with a report that said between 45,000 and 95,000 medical errors occur annually,” Bonham observes. “This is an amazing statistic. Who are better prepared to help improve patient safety than nursing professionals? They are putting their hands on the patients and families more than anybody else, figuratively speaking.”

The new school’s nursing curriculum will have four anchors. “One is inter-professional education,” Bonham explains. “That means nursing students and medical students are educating shoulder to shoulder, so they are seeing the same cases together. They are really learning how to communicate early in their careers, so these communication skills will go with them throughout the educational process.”

    Other program anchors include:

  • patient-centered technologies (including teletechnology, such as electronic medical records, in research and patient care)
  • scientific rigor (enabling graduates to utilize best practices based on evidence, not instinct)
  • preparation in leadership, management and communication skills.

    Master’s degrees will be conferred following a two- to three-year program. Ph.D program length will vary depending on the scope of specific research projects.

“Another important thing is to provide qualified nurse educators,” Bonham says. “When we think about the nursing shortage in California and across the nation, one of the barriers is having sufficient faculty. The mean age is over 50 and many are retiring, so we have to think about new professoriate. We believe a key contribution of the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing is to provide those outstanding nurse educators, as well as the practicing nurses.”

Touro University in Vallejo offers programs for nursing, physician assistants and other health care professions. Recently, Touro’s Vallejo campus became the first college in the nation to offer a joint master’s degree in both public health and physician assistant. The program has two tracks: community health and global health.

In January 2007, students in Touro’s double master program traveled to Ethiopia, where they worked at a hospital with a goal toward improving the health of people worldwide. Students helped conduct field research on malaria and evaluated the effectiveness of a tuberculosis treatment program.

Ryan Garson, a Touro student who participated in the Ethiopia project, plans to focus on pediatrics after graduating in 2008. He concludes, “This was definitely a worthwhile experience that gave me a global perspective on the delivery of health care from a public health viewpoint.”

As the baby boomer generation enters retirement age and demand increases for affordable and accessible healthcare services, career opportunities for students in nursing and physician assistant programs should remain strong for the foreseeable future.


Solano Magazine / February-March 2008 / Top Doctors 2008

 

Top Doctors 2008

Who would your doctor go see?

Solano Magazine

One of the most critical decisions you’ll ever make for yourself or your family is selecting the right physician: one who you feel comfortable with, who listens to your concerns and offers not just solutions but a sympathetic ear. Being in a region with such prominent, esteemed medical facilities, we know that such a choice can be difficult.

In our first Top Doctors survey in 2005, we asked licensed physicians practicing within our region who among their peers they would recommend to family and friends. The results appeared in our November/December 2005 issue. Complemented by a peer-reviewed list of physicians in the UC Davis Health System compiled by Best Doctors, the directory presented nearly 200 names in specialties ranging from allergy to vascular surgery.

Now, a couple years later, it is time to do it again. As before, we asked licensed physicians for their candidates in any or all of 29 specialties, or as a write-in, on our survey. (For information on how we conducted the survey, see the sidebar on page 50.) Thanks to all the physicians who took the time to respond, we are proud to present this directory of 101 doctors in 31 specialties. Some of these doctors appeared in our last survey, and many are new. We again included an updated list from Best Doctors.

We also spoke up close and personal with six doctors who represent a cross-section of specialties. In addition to their profiles, the physicians addressed one more critical question: how a patient should choose a physician. While it was pointed out that an insurance plan is often what dictates physician selection, all our physicians agreed that the individual should still select a doctor who they respect and trust with their health care decisions. For their answers, and answers from the doctors profiled in our 2005 survey, read “How to choose a physician”.

Without further ado, here are the results of our 2008 Top Doctors survey. We at Solano Magazine wish you the best of health and happiness for the year!

Allergy and Immunology

Ronald Brown, M.D.
Sutter West Medical Group
1970 Lake Blvd., Suite 2
Davis (530) 792-2820
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
770 Mason St.
Vacaville (707) 454-5860

Guillermo Mendoza, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vacaville
3700 Vaca Valley Parkway
Vacaville (707) 453-5620

Larry Posner, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1100 Pear Tree Lane
Napa (707) 258-8100

Anesthesiology

Howard Haynes, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-3450

Daniel Masluk, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1000 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 252-4411, ext. 2715

Ryk Tanalski, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-3450

Cardiac Surgery

Ramzi Deeik, M.D.
Napa Valley Cardiac and
Thoracic Surgery
1100 Trancas St. 
Napa (707) 254-9640

Robert Klingman, M.D.
Napa Valley Cardiac and
Thoracic Surgery
1100 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 254-9640

Cardiology

Cyrus Mancherje, M.D.
Intercommunity Medical Group/Solano Cardiology Consultants
1525 Webster St.
Fairfield (707) 423-2511
171 Butcher Road
Vacaville (707) 449-5970

Sergio Manubens, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 2
Napa (707) 253-8280

Celeste Spillane, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1066

James Srebro, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 2
Napa (707) 253-8280

David Williams, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1066

Colon and Rectal Surgery

George Berndt, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1062

Robert White, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3434 Villa Lane Suite 260
Napa (707) 224-7757

Dermatology

Eileen Crowley, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1052

Eric Fromer, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vacaville
3700 Vaca Valley Parkway
Vacaville (707) 453-5446

John Geisse, M.D.
Solano Dermatology Associates
2290 Sacramento St.
Vallejo (707) 643-5785

Robin Gray, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1052

Debra Horney, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1207 Fairchild Court
Woodland (530) 666-1631

Sarah Porkka, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1100 Trancas St., Suite 211
Napa (707) 224-4250

Diane Silver, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1100 Trancas St., Suite 301
Napa (707) 257-2888

Diagnostic Radiology
Andrew Nicks, M.D.
Radiology Medical Group of Napa
1000 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 257-4064

Patrick Saunders, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1207 Fairchild Court
Woodland (530) 666-1631

Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Maggie Che, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vacaville
3700 Vaca Valley Parkway
Vacaville (707) 453-5000

Eugene Eisenberg, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3434 Villa Lane Suite 280
Napa (707) 259-6767

Yshay Shlesinger, M.D.
John Muir Network
400 El Cerro Blvd., Suite 106
Danville (925) 552-5280

Sue Stevens, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2570

Family Practice/General Medicine
James Cotter, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Napa
3285 Claremont Way
Napa (707) 258-2500

John Dermody, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1001 Professional Drive
Napa (707) 252-0494

David Gilliam, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
1620 Pennsylvania Ave., Suite C
Fairfield (707) 428-4878

Thomas Suard, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1155 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 252-4781

Gastroenterology

David Freeto, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 4
Napa (707) 257-0447

Aaron Levy, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-3264

Henry Mok, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1321 Cottonwood St.
Woodland (530) 668-2618

Merle Sogge, M.D.
Intercommunity Medical Group
1525 Webster St., Suite A
Fairfield (707) 423-2506
171 Butcher Road,
Vacaville (707) 449-5970
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
2702 Low Court,
Fairfield (707) 432-2600

Robert Talley, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane Suite 4
Napa (707) 257-0447

Ali Vaziri, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
935 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 255-8207

General Surgery

Robert Dunham, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3434 Villa Lane Suite 260
Napa (707) 224-7757

Jay Isaacson, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1062

Robert Lanflisi, M.D.
Sutter Solano Medical Center
1245 Travis Blvd., Suite F
Fairfield (707) 426-4951
1001 Nut Tree Road, Vacaville
100 Hospital Drive, Suite 110, Vallejo

Douglas Lurie, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1321 Cottonwood St.
Woodland (530) 668-2618

Haroon Mojaddidi, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
2702 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 432-2600

Wendell Wenneker, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 3
Napa (707) 226-2031

Gynecology / Obstetrics

Ruth Goldenberg, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1031

Susana Gomez-Gonzalez, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1100 Trancas St. Suite 209
Napa (707) 251-1850

Anat Sapan, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
770 Mason St.
Vacaville (707) 454-5800
100 Hospital Drive
Vallejo (707) 551-3600

Hematology

Bruce Clark, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1077

Chainarong Limvarapuss, M.D.
Sutter Solano Cancer Center
100 Hospital Drive, Suite 110
Vallejo,  (707) 551-3300
2720 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 426-3911

Daniel Mirda, M.D.
Redwood Regional Medical Group
1100 Trancas St. Suite 256
Napa (707) 253-7161

Infectious Disease

Stuart Linne, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1207 Fairchild Court
Woodland (530) 668-2650

Stephen Parodi, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1075

Kenyon Rupnik, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 9
Napa (707) 253-8901

Internal Medicine

Richard Fleming, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1025

David Jue, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3010 Beard Road
Napa (707) 257-1550

Thor Start, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1025

Neurology

Richard Beyer, M.D.
Woodland Healthcare
1207 Fairchild Court
Woodland (530) 668-2657
2330 W. Covell Blvd.
Davis (530) 756-2364

Ardith Courtney, D.O.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
980 Trancas St., Suite 5
Napa (707) 251-8610

Kai Lee, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2590

Albert M. Mitchell, D.O.
NorthBay Medical Center
1101 B. Gale Wilson Blvd.,
Suite 206
Fairfield (707) 426-5915

Vivek Pai, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2590

Margaret Schlatter, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1001 Professional Drive
Napa (707) 252-6546

Oncology

Bruce Clark, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1077

Paul Dugan, M.D.
Redwood Regional Medical Group
1100 Trancas St. Suite 256
Napa (707) 253-7161

Louis Fehrenbacher, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1077

Chainarong Limvarapuss, M.D.
Sutter Solano Cancer Center
100 Hospital Drive, Suite 110
Vallejo (707) 551-3300
2720 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 426-3911

James Long, M.D.
NorthBay Cancer Center
1860 Pennsylvania Ave. Suite 230
Fairfield (707) 429-6989

Daniel Mirda, M.D.
Redwood Regional Medical Group
1100 Trancas St. Suite 256
Napa (707) 253-7161

Gregory Smith, M.D.
St. Helena Hospital
6 Woodland Road Suite 304
St. Helena (707) 967-5721

Ophthalmology

Richard Beller, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
895 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 252-2020

John Hills, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vacaville
3700 Vaca Valley Parkway
Vacaville (707) 453-5600

Robert Miller, M.D.
Medical Vision Technology
120-A West Court St.
Woodland (530) 668-6000
635 Anderson Road, Davis
(530) 756-5040

Orthopedic Surgery

Mark Bernstein, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2549

Dennis Chin, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2549

John Diana, M.D.
Napa Valley Orthopaedic Medical Group, Inc.
1100 Trancas St. Suite 250
Napa (707) 254-7117

Adam Freedhand, M.D.
Napa Valley Orthopaedic Medical Group, Inc.
1100 Trancas St. Suite 250
Napa (707) 254-7117

Yassamin Hazrati, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2549

John Kofoed, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
2702 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 432-2600
770 Mason St.
Vacaville (707) 454-5800

Steven McGrath, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-2549

Otolaryngology

Laurence Ariyasu, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1055

Kathleen Healey, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
980 Trancas St., Suite 10
Napa (707) 258-8037

Lorri Henderson, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
2702 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 432-2600

Jonathan Owens, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
895 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 252-0990

Tim Wild, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vacaville
3700 Vaca Valley Parkway
Vacaville (707) 453-5443

Murray Woolf, M.D.
NorthBay Medical Center
1710 Pennsylvania Ave., Suite D
Fairfield (707) 423-2000

Pain Management

Kevin Cheng, D.O.
Kaiser Permenente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1025

Pediatric Specialist

Don Wong, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
980 Trancas St., Suite 4
Napa (707) 253-7337

Pediatrics

Christine Loffler-Barry, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
2160 Jefferson St., Suite 260
Napa (707) 259-0700

Robert Losey, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
1100 Trancas St. Suite 270
Napa (707) 252-1076

Edward Martin, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1037

Victoria Morgese, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
2160 Jefferson St., Suite 260
Napa (707) 259-0700

Psychiatry

Joel Fine, M.D.
NorthBay Healthcare
555 Mason St.
Vacaville (707) 447-3880

Anina Schwartz, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
1761 Broadway St., Suite 100
Vallejo (707) 645-2700

Rheumatology

Wilson Yap, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1075

Sleep Medicine

Hossein Razavi, M.D.
St. Helena Hospital
6 Woodland Road, Suite 203
St. Helena (707) 963-0267

Thoracic Surgery

Robert Klingman, M.D.
Napa Valley Cardiac and Thoracic Surgery
1100 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 254-9640

Trauma/Critical Care Surgeon

Jon Perlstein, M.D.
David Grant Medical Center
101 Bodin Circle
Travis AFB (707) 423-5224

Urology

Eric Engelman, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1092

Thomas Hildreth, M.D.
Queen of The Valley Medical Center
1100 Trancas St. Suite 213
Napa (707) 224-7944

Edward Levin, M.D.
Sutter Regional Medical Foundation
770 Mason St.
Vacaville (707) 454-5800
2702 Low Court
Fairfield (707) 432-2600

Ermis Nikas, D.O.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1092

Vascular & Interventional Radiology

David Goller, M.D.
Radiology Medical Group of Napa
1000 Trancas St.
Napa (707) 257-4064

Isaac Kaplan, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1315

Vascular Surgery

Chong Lee, M.D.
Kaiser Permanente Vallejo
975 Sereno Drive
Vallejo (707) 651-1062

John Loftus, M.D.
Queen of the Valley Medical Center
3443 Villa Lane, Suite 3
Napa (707) 226-2031

 

 

 

 

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